Preparing For Death

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Submitted by: Jeanne May

Death is a topic many people try to avoid thinking and talking about! I know it’s uncomfortable, emotionally laden, and it isn’t the easiest to contemplate. But the fact is, no matter how much you try to avoid it — it will eventually find you! No one escapes!

I’m a psychologist and for about 15 years was a loss and grief counsellor and educator… so I’m well aware of how death is not the most popular conversation item!

But the thing is… when you are faced with the imminent (or sudden) death of someone you love you are most likely experiencing a multitude of thoughts and emotions. And then you may have to make decisions about things, like the funeral, which are highly charged emotional stuff … and it can turn into an emotional nightmare if nothing has been discussed.

Now I’m not saying that talking about death, making your wishes and desires known, finding out what your loved ones want as well, will take away the pain of bereavement… but it can go a long way to help people deal with what is already a difficult time.

And remember that by talking about death, by making a few decisions now, by doing a few things now, will not make your death happen any quicker!

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A few things things you can do now:

1) Have you got a will? Too often people don’t make a will… it’s something they don’t get around to doing; they have a belief that if they write a will they are also writing their death sentence (I’ve had that said to me a number of times); or they argue what’s the point in writing a will when they haven’t got anything to leave. A will is important. And they are easy to do — they don’t have to be complicated. Forms are available so you can even do it yourself.

2) Once you have made your will — put it in a safe place and let people know where it is. I have seen a number of families not able to begin to deal with things (the practicalities involved after death) because they do not know where the will is and nothing can move forward until the will is read.

3) Update your will particularly when your circumstances change e.g. birth of a child, a divorce, change in asset wealth, death in the family.

4) Do you know what funeral director you would like to be used? This is something that you can make a decision about now without making any commitment (e.g. outlaying money). I know many people say they don’t care and that it can be decided by families when the time comes, but it is much easier for those left if they can be guided by what you would like.

5) Do you know whether you want to be buried or cremated? Again this can be a difficult decision for families to make particularly if there are differing views within the family. If they can be guided by your wishes it can make the decision easier.

6) If you’re going to be cremated… do you know where you would like your ashes to be put? In reality, your physical body won’t know a thing about it (note I said physical body) but if you have a favourite place it can be useful for family to know.

On this point… be careful about saying things like you want to be put under the orange tree in the back garden. If ashes are placed at a home it can be difficult for family members to move away from the home e.g. if the house needs to be sold at some stage.

7) Have you thought about this scenario… if you die a long way from home e.g. overseas, interstate, do you want your body returned home for the funeral? This can place a huge burden, both financial and emotional, on family members. Let people know if it is okay for them not to bring your body back but maybe your ashes.

8) Have you thought about organ donation? If you die suddenly, in an accident for instance, your family may be asked to consider donating your organs. Now that can be an enormous decision for family members to make particularly if they have got no idea how you feel about that! Organ donation is a major issue in Australia because there are nowhere near enough organ donors. Many people I have spoken with over the years have said that they would like to donate their organs but they haven’t told anybody or made it official!

These are just a few practical things you can begin to think about and do. It is not morbid to begin to plan for your death… death is a reality. And once you have have done these things, and let your thoughts and wishes known to people concerned, you don’t have to think about it again. And it is easier, much easier, for family members in the long run. I know because I recently went through this with my dad.

About the Author: Jeanne May of Aspirations Plus, works people providing them information, aspiration, guidance and support to achieve their goals and dreams. Receive a bonus copy of “#1 Ingredient To Fast Track Your Success!” by subscribing to Aspirations Plus at

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Historic ‘Tree of Knowledge’ dies in Queensland, Australia

Wednesday, October 4, 2006 

The tree said to be the birthplace of the centre-left Australian Labor Party, the Tree of Knowledge, in Barcaldine, Queensland has been pronounced dead by a tree doctor.

In May the 200-year-old tree was poisoned with up to 40 liters of Glyphosate, the main ingredient in the herbicide Roundup.

“In May we noticed the leaves falling off it. Now there are no leaves and the limbs are up there in the air just like a ghost,” caretaker and local ALP president Pat Ogden said.

According to party mythology the first branch of the ALP was founded under the tree in 1891 by protesting sheep shearers. They were confronted by 1000 soldiers and police for the colonial government and felt threatened of attack. Eventually their leaders were arrested and replacement workers were brought in.

Mr. Ogden, said on ABC radio, referring to the future of the tree “…it really hasn’t been discussed yet, but the general consensus is that we’ll prune it right back and leave the main part of the tree there and, sort of make a monument out of it…The council are trustees of it, so it’ll be up to them to make a final decision.”

However those who fear that this may be the death of the tree’s DNA have nothing to fear as there is an offspring tree called Young ‘Un which was cut during the centenary of the protest and is in the Australian Worker’s Heritage Centre in Barcaldine. Local leaders and agricultural officials are trying to create a nursery to create seedlings for sale. The project is still in its trial stage after difficulties in getting the plants to prosper. The Department of Primary Industries are using both grafting and cloning techniques to aid the project.

“If we are successful we could have one in every botanical garden in Australia,” says the Mayor of Barcaldine, Rob Chandler.

Tourism for the town increased as people wanted to see the tree before it died.

Mr. Chandler is proposing a farewell ceremony which he hopes will attract many of Labor’s highly distinguished.

Police are investigating the poisoning.

The ALP has posted an $AU10,000 reward for any information that can help catch those responsible.


380 million year old fossilized trees found in New York, USA

Thursday, April 19, 2007 

Two fossilized trees with their roots, trunks and heads still attached, and are said to be over 380 million years old, have been found in the state of New York inside a rock quarry near Gilboa, New York in the USA.

Researchers call the extinct tree a Wattieza and this particular tree stood over 30 feet tall and used spores to reproduce rather than seeds. It may have even looked like many palms trees that exist today, but did not have any leaves. Instead they had fronds much like a fern.

“These were very big trees. Our reconstruction shows them to be a lot longer and much more treelike than any of the reconstructions before. I don’t think any of us dared think of them being quite that big,” said paleobotanist at the State University of New York at Binghamton, and one of the researchers who studied the tree, William Stein.

Over 130 years ago in 1870, the same kind of trees, but only the stumps, were also found in Gilboa after flood waters caused the stumps to be exposed. A few decades later in the 1920s, another set of stumps were found in the same area.

In 2004, the researchers found a top to one of the trees that weighed almost 400 pounds not too far from Gilboa.

Researchers say that these trees likely shaped the forests of Earth as we see them today, and that the trees existed long before dinosaurs were roaming the planet.

“In forming the first forests, they must have really changed the Earth system as a whole, creating new types of micro-environments for smaller plants and insects, storing large amounts of carbon and binding the soil together. The rise of forests removed a lot of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. This caused temperatures to drop and the planet became very similar to its present-day conditions,” said the leader of the research team, Christopher Berry.

Wattiezas were most common during the Devonian period and existed on the planet before fish evolved sufficiently to leave the seas.


Historic ‘Tree of Knowledge’ dies in Queensland, Australia

Wednesday, October 4, 2006 

The tree said to be the birthplace of the centre-left Australian Labor Party, the Tree of Knowledge, in Barcaldine, Queensland has been pronounced dead by a tree doctor.

In May the 200-year-old tree was poisoned with up to 40 liters of Glyphosate, the main ingredient in the herbicide Roundup.

“In May we noticed the leaves falling off it. Now there are no leaves and the limbs are up there in the air just like a ghost,” caretaker and local ALP president Pat Ogden said.

According to party mythology the first branch of the ALP was founded under the tree in 1891 by protesting sheep shearers. They were confronted by 1000 soldiers and police for the colonial government and felt threatened of attack. Eventually their leaders were arrested and replacement workers were brought in.

Mr. Ogden, said on ABC radio, referring to the future of the tree “…it really hasn’t been discussed yet, but the general consensus is that we’ll prune it right back and leave the main part of the tree there and, sort of make a monument out of it…The council are trustees of it, so it’ll be up to them to make a final decision.”

However those who fear that this may be the death of the tree’s DNA have nothing to fear as there is an offspring tree called Young ‘Un which was cut during the centenary of the protest and is in the Australian Worker’s Heritage Centre in Barcaldine. Local leaders and agricultural officials are trying to create a nursery to create seedlings for sale. The project is still in its trial stage after difficulties in getting the plants to prosper. The Department of Primary Industries are using both grafting and cloning techniques to aid the project.

“If we are successful we could have one in every botanical garden in Australia,” says the Mayor of Barcaldine, Rob Chandler.

Tourism for the town increased as people wanted to see the tree before it died.

Mr. Chandler is proposing a farewell ceremony which he hopes will attract many of Labor’s highly distinguished.

Police are investigating the poisoning.

The ALP has posted an $AU10,000 reward for any information that can help catch those responsible.


How To Balance Work And Baby After Child Birth

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How To Balance Work And Baby After Child Birth

by

Imogene Smith

Work and handling a kid can be quite hectic individually. Together, they can seriously stress you out. Most mummies constantly return to work after a delivery with a certain quantity of guilt for not hanging out with their baby and find it worrying to concentrate on either of the jobs. There are ways to strike a balance between the 2. Here we look at how you can achieve it.

Before you embark upon balancing the two, it’s vital to gauge your desire towards work. Firstly, work out if you would like to keep on working or not. This will help you a lot in juggling both the work and the baby better. It is common sight to see many women reluctant to join the office post motherhood. One giant reason for this is the rest period comes to an end. If you can’t sideline this factor, it is suggested to engage in reasons that will help you join the office with a self will. Some interesting reasons can be meeting co-workers, office gossip, office get together and lots more. As and when you develop an interest in joining the office and getting back to work, juggling between work and baby will come naturally to you.

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Once you recover your inducement to work, you will find it easier to balance baby and job. Once you have successfully satisfied yourself to go to the office, you have to do some effective time division. This is by far the most critical make allowance for striking the right balance between a job and your baby. So divide your time between what you’ll spend at office and that which you will spend with your family. With separate time periods allotted to both concerns you’ll be more capable of completing jobs in the given As an example, you may finish a specific office job in the time set for office hours. This will also help boost your efficiency.

Make a time table. Timetables are always of real help and more so when you’re a working mother. Prepare an itinerary of the things you need to do, in advance. Along side, mention the time in which you want to accomplish these things. Keep on finishing your roles as specified by the time table. By the end of the day, you will realize that both work and the baby are well attended to without you having to fret.

However, it is crucial that you allow for some discretion in the time table you have set. It is reasonably possible that you may not be in a position to finish off a task in the required time. There may be some surprising events that might delay your list. So, don’t be extremely rigid about sticking to the timetable as this would only raise your stress levels.

It is not going to be easy to meet your work commitments and give your baby the time that he deserves simultaneously. But, if you learn to prioritize and plan well, things aren’t going to be that complicated either.

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How To Balance Work And Baby After Child Birth


Toronto Star

The Toronto Star is a Canadian broadsheet daily newspaper. In 2011, it was Canada’s highest-circulation newspaper, although also the one with the second-largest decline in readership between 2007 and 2011 among Canada’s top 25 newspapers. It is owned by Toronto Star Newspapers Ltd., a division of Star Media Group, a subsidiary of Torstar Corporation.

The Star (originally known as the Evening Star and then the Toronto Daily Star ) was created in 1892 by striking Afternoon News printers and writers, led by future Mayor of Toronto and social reformer Horatio Clarence Hocken, who became the newspaper’s founder, along with another future mayor, Jimmy Simpson. The paper did poorly in its first few years. It prospered under Joseph “Holy Joe” Atkinson, editor from 1899 until his death in 1948.

Atkinson had a strong social conscience. He championed many causes that would come to be associated with the modern welfare state: old age pensions, unemployment insurance, and health care. The Government of Canada Digital Collections website describes Atkinson as “a ‘radical’ in the best sense of that term…. The Star was unique among North American newspapers in its consistent, ongoing advocacy of the interests of ordinary people. The friendship of Atkinson, the publisher, with Mackenzie King, the prime minister, was a major influence on the development of Canadian social policy.”[6]

Atkinson became the controlling shareholder of the Star. The Toronto Daily Star was frequently criticized for practising the yellow journalism of its era. For decades, the paper included heavy doses of crime and sensationalism, along with advocating social change. From 1910 to 1973, the Star published a weekend supplement, the Star Weekly.

Its early opposition and criticism of the Nazi regime[7] saw the paper become one of the first North American papers to be banned in Germany by its government.[8]

In 1971, the Toronto Daily Star was renamed The Toronto Star and moved to a modern office tower at One Yonge Street by Queens Quay. The original Star Building at 80 King Street West was demolished. The new building originally housed the paper’s presses. In 1992, the printing plant was moved to the Highway 407 & 400 interchange in Vaughan. In September 2002, the logo was changed, and “The” was dropped from the papers. During the 2003 blackout, the Star printed the paper at a press in Welland, Ontario.

Until the mid-2000s, the front page of the Toronto Star had no advertising.

On May 28, 2007, the Star unveiled a redesigned paper[9] that features larger type, narrower pages, fewer and shorter articles, renamed sections, more prominence to local news, and less prominence to international news, columnists, and opinion pieces. However, on January 1, 2009, The Star reverted to its pre-May 28, 2007 format. Star P.M., a free newspaper in PDF format that could be downloaded from the newspaper’s website each weekday afternoon, was discontinued in October 2007, thirteen months after its launch.

In October 2012, the Star announced its intention to implement a paywall on its website, thestar.com, in 2013.[10] On August 13, 2013, the Toronto Star officially launched its paywall; those with home delivery every day have free access to all its digital content. Those without a digital subscription can view up to ten articles a month.[11][12] The paywall does not apply to its sister sites, such as wheels.ca (automotive news and classifieds).

Shortly before his death in 1948, Atkinson transferred ownership of the paper to a charitable organization given the mandate of continuing the paper’s liberal tradition.[13] In 1949, the Province of Ontario passed a law (which was repealed in 2009)[14] barring charitable organizations from owning large parts of profit-making businesses[15] that effectively required the Star to be sold. The five trustees of the charitable organization circumvented the law by buying the paper themselves and swearing before the Supreme Court of Ontario to continue the Atkinson Principles:[16]

Descendants of the original owners, known as “the five families”, still control the voting shares of Torstar,[17] and the Atkinson Principles continue to guide the paper to this day. In February 2006, Star media columnist Antonia Zerbisias wrote on her blog:

Its precise position in the political spectrum — especially in relation to one of its principal competitors, The Globe and Mail — is at times disputed but the Star is generally considered to be the most liberal of Canada’s major papers.[19][better source needed] Long a voice of Canadian nationalism, the paper opposed free trade with the United States in the 1980s and has recently[when?] expressed concern about U.S. takeovers of Canadian firms.

Editorial positions have taken a more moderate stance after the rise of the Toronto Sun, often to the surprise of habitual readers. The Star was an early opponent of the Iraq War and sharply criticized most policies of George W. Bush, but supported Canadian participation in U.S. continental missile defense.[citation needed] Editorials have denounced political correctness at Canadian universities,[citation needed] opposed proportional representation,[citation needed] and yet called for more restrictive copyright laws.[citation needed]

In the early 2000s, the newspaper has promoted “a new deal for cities”.

The paper usually endorses the Liberal Party federally. The Star was the only major daily to do so in the 2006 and the 2008 federal elections while many of the other major papers endorsed the Conservatives. The Star endorsed the social democratic New Democratic Party (NDP) leader Ed Broadbent in 1979 and it has been over forty years since it last endorsed the Progressive Conservative party under leader Robert Stanfield in 1972. The paper endorsed the Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario in some of the provincial elections from the 1940s to the 1980s, and endorsed strategic voting to try to defeat Mike Harris in 1999 which they failed to do.[citation needed]

Though Toronto mayoral elections are non-partisan, during the 2010 mayoral election, it endorsed George Smitherman, who before the election was a provincial cabinet member of McGuinty’s Liberal government.[20]

The Toronto Star endorsed the NDP for the 2011 federal election,[21] stating that its platform “puts people first” and that Jack Layton has won the trust of many voters. To avoid vote-splitting that could inadvertently help the Conservatives under Stephen Harper, which it saw as the worst outcome for the country, the paper also recommended Canadians vote strategically by voting for “the progressive candidate best placed to win” in certain ridings.[22]

The Star is one of only two Canadian newspapers that employs a “public editor” (ombudsman) and was the first to do so. Its newsroom policy and journalistic standards guide is also published online.[23]

Other notable features include:

The Star states that it favours an inclusive, “big tent” approach, not wishing to attract one group of readers at the expense of others. It publishes special sections for Chinese New Year and Gay Pride Week, along with regular features on real estate (including condominiums), shopping, automobiles (as Wheels), and travel destinations.

The advent of the National Post in 1998 shook up the Toronto newspaper market. In the upheaval that followed, editorial spending increased and there was much hiring and firing of editors and publishers. Toronto newspapers have yet to undergo the large-scale layoffs that have occurred at most other newspapers in Canada and the United States.

The Toronto Star has been profitable in most recent years. The residual strength of the Star is its commanding circulation lead in Ontario. The paper remains a “must buy” for most advertisers. Some competing papers consistently lose money, are only marginally profitable, or do not break out earnings in a way that makes comparison possible. However, the Star has long been criticized for inflating circulation through bulk sales at discount rates.

Margins have declined and some losses have been recorded. In 2006, several financial analysts expressed dissatisfaction with The Star’s performance and downgraded their recommendations on the stock of its parent company, Torstar. In October 2006, the publisher and editor-in-chief of The Star were replaced amid reports of boardroom battles about the direction of the company. A redesigned paper launched in May 2007. It featured 17% less space for editorial content and a greater emphasis on local coverage. However, the paper reverted to its pre-May 2007 design on January 1, 2009.

In 1998,[30] the Toronto Star purchased a majority stake in Sing Tao’s Canadian newspaper, which it jointly owns with Sing Tao News Corporation.[31] Sing Tao (Canada) encountered controversy in April 2008 after media watchers discovered the paper had altered a translated Toronto Star article about the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games protests to adhere to Chinese government’s official line.[30] Sing Tao’s then editor Wilson Chan was fired over changes to the translated article.[32]

Joe Shuster, one of the two creators of DC Comics superhero Superman, worked for the Star as a paperboy in the 1920s. Shuster named Clark Kent’s paper The Daily Star in honour of The Toronto Daily Star. The name of Kent’s paper was later changed to The Daily Planet.


Toronto Star

The Toronto Star is a Canadian broadsheet daily newspaper. In 2011, it was Canada’s highest-circulation newspaper, although also the one with the second-largest decline in readership between 2007 and 2011 among Canada’s top 25 newspapers. It is owned by Toronto Star Newspapers Ltd., a division of Star Media Group, a subsidiary of Torstar Corporation.

The Star (originally known as the Evening Star and then the Toronto Daily Star ) was created in 1892 by striking Afternoon News printers and writers, led by future Mayor of Toronto and social reformer Horatio Clarence Hocken, who became the newspaper’s founder, along with another future mayor, Jimmy Simpson. The paper did poorly in its first few years. It prospered under Joseph “Holy Joe” Atkinson, editor from 1899 until his death in 1948.

Atkinson had a strong social conscience. He championed many causes that would come to be associated with the modern welfare state: old age pensions, unemployment insurance, and health care. The Government of Canada Digital Collections website describes Atkinson as “a ‘radical’ in the best sense of that term…. The Star was unique among North American newspapers in its consistent, ongoing advocacy of the interests of ordinary people. The friendship of Atkinson, the publisher, with Mackenzie King, the prime minister, was a major influence on the development of Canadian social policy.”[6]

Atkinson became the controlling shareholder of the Star. The Toronto Daily Star was frequently criticized for practising the yellow journalism of its era. For decades, the paper included heavy doses of crime and sensationalism, along with advocating social change. From 1910 to 1973, the Star published a weekend supplement, the Star Weekly.

Its early opposition and criticism of the Nazi regime[7] saw the paper become one of the first North American papers to be banned in Germany by its government.[8]

In 1971, the Toronto Daily Star was renamed The Toronto Star and moved to a modern office tower at One Yonge Street by Queens Quay. The original Star Building at 80 King Street West was demolished. The new building originally housed the paper’s presses. In 1992, the printing plant was moved to the Highway 407 & 400 interchange in Vaughan. In September 2002, the logo was changed, and “The” was dropped from the papers. During the 2003 blackout, the Star printed the paper at a press in Welland, Ontario.

Until the mid-2000s, the front page of the Toronto Star had no advertising.

On May 28, 2007, the Star unveiled a redesigned paper[9] that features larger type, narrower pages, fewer and shorter articles, renamed sections, more prominence to local news, and less prominence to international news, columnists, and opinion pieces. However, on January 1, 2009, The Star reverted to its pre-May 28, 2007 format. Star P.M., a free newspaper in PDF format that could be downloaded from the newspaper’s website each weekday afternoon, was discontinued in October 2007, thirteen months after its launch.

In October 2012, the Star announced its intention to implement a paywall on its website, thestar.com, in 2013.[10] On August 13, 2013, the Toronto Star officially launched its paywall; those with home delivery every day have free access to all its digital content. Those without a digital subscription can view up to ten articles a month.[11][12] The paywall does not apply to its sister sites, such as wheels.ca (automotive news and classifieds).

Shortly before his death in 1948, Atkinson transferred ownership of the paper to a charitable organization given the mandate of continuing the paper’s liberal tradition.[13] In 1949, the Province of Ontario passed a law (which was repealed in 2009)[14] barring charitable organizations from owning large parts of profit-making businesses[15] that effectively required the Star to be sold. The five trustees of the charitable organization circumvented the law by buying the paper themselves and swearing before the Supreme Court of Ontario to continue the Atkinson Principles:[16]

Descendants of the original owners, known as “the five families”, still control the voting shares of Torstar,[17] and the Atkinson Principles continue to guide the paper to this day. In February 2006, Star media columnist Antonia Zerbisias wrote on her blog:

Its precise position in the political spectrum — especially in relation to one of its principal competitors, The Globe and Mail — is at times disputed but the Star is generally considered to be the most liberal of Canada’s major papers.[19][better source needed] Long a voice of Canadian nationalism, the paper opposed free trade with the United States in the 1980s and has recently[when?] expressed concern about U.S. takeovers of Canadian firms.

Editorial positions have taken a more moderate stance after the rise of the Toronto Sun, often to the surprise of habitual readers. The Star was an early opponent of the Iraq War and sharply criticized most policies of George W. Bush, but supported Canadian participation in U.S. continental missile defense.[citation needed] Editorials have denounced political correctness at Canadian universities,[citation needed] opposed proportional representation,[citation needed] and yet called for more restrictive copyright laws.[citation needed]

In the early 2000s, the newspaper has promoted “a new deal for cities”.

The paper usually endorses the Liberal Party federally. The Star was the only major daily to do so in the 2006 and the 2008 federal elections while many of the other major papers endorsed the Conservatives. The Star endorsed the social democratic New Democratic Party (NDP) leader Ed Broadbent in 1979 and it has been over forty years since it last endorsed the Progressive Conservative party under leader Robert Stanfield in 1972. The paper endorsed the Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario in some of the provincial elections from the 1940s to the 1980s, and endorsed strategic voting to try to defeat Mike Harris in 1999 which they failed to do.[citation needed]

Though Toronto mayoral elections are non-partisan, during the 2010 mayoral election, it endorsed George Smitherman, who before the election was a provincial cabinet member of McGuinty’s Liberal government.[20]

The Toronto Star endorsed the NDP for the 2011 federal election,[21] stating that its platform “puts people first” and that Jack Layton has won the trust of many voters. To avoid vote-splitting that could inadvertently help the Conservatives under Stephen Harper, which it saw as the worst outcome for the country, the paper also recommended Canadians vote strategically by voting for “the progressive candidate best placed to win” in certain ridings.[22]

The Star is one of only two Canadian newspapers that employs a “public editor” (ombudsman) and was the first to do so. Its newsroom policy and journalistic standards guide is also published online.[23]

Other notable features include:

The Star states that it favours an inclusive, “big tent” approach, not wishing to attract one group of readers at the expense of others. It publishes special sections for Chinese New Year and Gay Pride Week, along with regular features on real estate (including condominiums), shopping, automobiles (as Wheels), and travel destinations.

The advent of the National Post in 1998 shook up the Toronto newspaper market. In the upheaval that followed, editorial spending increased and there was much hiring and firing of editors and publishers. Toronto newspapers have yet to undergo the large-scale layoffs that have occurred at most other newspapers in Canada and the United States.

The Toronto Star has been profitable in most recent years. The residual strength of the Star is its commanding circulation lead in Ontario. The paper remains a “must buy” for most advertisers. Some competing papers consistently lose money, are only marginally profitable, or do not break out earnings in a way that makes comparison possible. However, the Star has long been criticized for inflating circulation through bulk sales at discount rates.

Margins have declined and some losses have been recorded. In 2006, several financial analysts expressed dissatisfaction with The Star’s performance and downgraded their recommendations on the stock of its parent company, Torstar. In October 2006, the publisher and editor-in-chief of The Star were replaced amid reports of boardroom battles about the direction of the company. A redesigned paper launched in May 2007. It featured 17% less space for editorial content and a greater emphasis on local coverage. However, the paper reverted to its pre-May 2007 design on January 1, 2009.

In 1998,[30] the Toronto Star purchased a majority stake in Sing Tao’s Canadian newspaper, which it jointly owns with Sing Tao News Corporation.[31] Sing Tao (Canada) encountered controversy in April 2008 after media watchers discovered the paper had altered a translated Toronto Star article about the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games protests to adhere to Chinese government’s official line.[30] Sing Tao’s then editor Wilson Chan was fired over changes to the translated article.[32]

Joe Shuster, one of the two creators of DC Comics superhero Superman, worked for the Star as a paperboy in the 1920s. Shuster named Clark Kent’s paper The Daily Star in honour of The Toronto Daily Star. The name of Kent’s paper was later changed to The Daily Planet.


UK home shopping retailer Shop Direct group to cut 1,150 jobs

Wednesday, January 28, 2009 

Shop Direct group, One of the United Kingdoms home shopping retailers are to cut 1,150 jobs as they shut down a call centre in Merseyside. The closure of the call centre was said to be part of the company’s transformation to an online-led business. 250 of the job loses are to be offered relocation within the company.

Currently 56% of Shop Directs business is in the form of online sales. They set for this to rise to 70% of sales within two years. Chief Executive of Shop Direct, Mark Newton Jones, said that Shop Direct is a strong and growing business and puts the cuts down to the way customers shop with the company.

“Our business is changing because the way our customers choose to shop with us is changing. We are a strong and growing business. In order to maintain this growth, we need to continue to adapt and change to the needs of our customers,” said Jones in a statement.

Over the 2008 Christmas period group sales were up 9% and online sales were up by 44%. According to the Liverpool Echo several staff were in tears after hearing the news and some collapsed.

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Moving Made Easy: Budget Boxes And Packing Materials

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Submitted by: Nathaniel Hilson

Once in our lives, we all get this urge to try new things, have new challenges, and move to a different place to explore our options and expand our territories. Relocating to a new area can open a whole new exciting chapter in our lives.

But we also know that moving can easily become a difficult and stressful task. We end up realizing that we have accumulated tons of stuff and things that we do not even remember where we got in the first place. The problem of how to move all these items can take lots of time, effort and money, so we just end up not enjoying going to a new place.

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There is a way though, how to lift some of that stress off our shoulders. In Winnipeg, moving boxes can help you be more efficient when transporting your things to your new apartment or location. Moving does not need to be costly because you can also look up companies that rent out used packing boxes in the Winnipeg area. To make things more convenient for the customer, moving companies also have services where customers can rent an entire list of moving equipment and storage supplies. This is a great and more practical option if you do not want to spend on expensive commercial moving boxes and an assortment of moving supplies.

Over the recent years thanks to strong campaigns and heightened awareness most services and suppliers have adapted ways to shift towards environment-friendly business practices. Moving companies are no exemption. Eco-friendly moving in Winnipeg is now possible through reusable plastic storage boxes around Winnipeg and wardrobes, and recycled paper that you can use when packing your things. Renting a moving box in Winnipeg will not only make your moving experience convenient and easy, but also leave less carbon footprint on the environment.

When moving to farther locations, getting help from professional movers is a way to speed up the process. Look up companies that have a complete line of materials that one might need for moving so that it becomes a one-stop-shop for all your moving supplies needs. Examples of important moving supplies are moving kits, hand trucks, platform moving dollies, bubble wrap, plastic covers, and moving blankets.

Besides getting familiar with the supplies you will need when moving, knowing if your supplier also offers shipping of boxes or pick-up and delivery services can be a huge help. Take advantage of these pick-up and delivery services so that you would not need to worry how to transport several numbers of moving boxes and containers.

Another important thing to consider when moving all your stuff to a new home or office location is safety. Your things are valuables that you certainly want to protect and pack in a way that would not break the item or damage it in any way. Find movers who have experience in packing certain fragile items or furniture so that you lessen the chances of stuff breaking or falling apart. Secure your belongings by using such protection as foam sheets, peanuts, bubble and shrink-wraps. These added packaging protection can keep your contents safe and in one piece.

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Talk:Smoke from massive warehouse fire in Buffalo, New York USA can be seen 40 miles away

I was on scene for about 4 hours…I have images I am uploading now. I talked to the police, as it was too dangerous to get close to the firemen, who were also too busy with the fire to even talk to the press yet. I also heard and saw the explosions and spoke to the ‘unnamed woman’ on the scene as well. DragonFire1024 04:07, 14 May 2007 (UTC)

Maybe this ‘ll attract voters to the FAC?!–Steven Fruitsmaak (Reply) 19:05, 16 May 2007 (UTC)

From the article:

As of 6:40 a.m., the fire was under control, and firefighters were attempting to stop it from spreading, but could get to center of the fire because of severe amounts of debris. Later in the morning, the fire was extinguished.

Should this not be

As of 6:40 a.m., the fire was under control, and firefighters were attempting to stop it from spreading, but could not get to center of the fire because of severe amounts of debris. Later in the morning, the fire was extinguished.

? Sancho 20:01, 16 April 2008 (UTC) Done Also added “the” to “center”. –SVTCobra 23:41, 17 April 2008 (UTC)

This sentence makes no sense:

One woman, who also wished not to be named as she is close to the unnamed owner of the warehouse, the buildings are filled with “classic cars, forklifts, and money” and that the man who owns the building “does not have insurance” coverage on the property.

I’d be making these changes myself, but I can only view the source.Sancho 20:04, 16 April 2008 (UTC)